“I want it now!”  Ugh, Veruca Salt, she was a rotten egg if I ever observed one (fact or fictional).  Are you being a brat in regard to online marketing traction?  Be truthful.  I will.  I don’t need a direct quote from my mom to tell readers I’ve had a history of being a little bratty.  I was an only child; give me some understanding.  As I matured, I’ve come to (most of the time) understand, patience is a virtue…both off and online.

 

 

If you’re reading this, it’s likely online marketing strikes your fancy.  What brand (startup, mid-size, gargantuan) doesn’t want to make it big…STAT?  (Did you know the medical term, STAT, stands for sooner than immediately?  I used to teach writing and English).  It’s taken some advice from industry sources to help me stay patient.  You better watch your speed too!

 

 

Know what else I really didn’t like doing as a younger man?  Listening to my elders.  Hey, what can I say?  I was a brat; such actions come with the appellation.  Dr. Pete of SEOmoz gave fatherly advice yesterday to new people on the search optimization scene.

It’s all great advice, especially the notion of “doing something.”  If you’re being bratty, I’ll assume you’re doing something; but, maybe it’s not enough.  Perhaps you’re spending too much time in your own brand’s chocolate factory.  Get out some more.  Have you thought about influencer marketing?  Eric Enge thinks you should (Don’t lend him a bratty ear either; his insight will only help you.)

Patience, doing things the slow/steady way, and making influential connections, helped one modern-day artist flourish.  I came across a WSJ article today, featuring a German artist, Gerhard Richter.  Richter did some paintings in the 1980s.  He waited.  He waited some more.  He saw no traction.  Not one, single painting sold.  (Admittedly, I’d get a little bratty, Gerhard.)  Let’s fast forward to modern times, where the tenacious artist sold one portrait for $16.5 million.  The WSJ’s Kelly Crow recognizes, “Few people can pinpoint the moment when an artist becomes iconic in the way of Pablo Picasso or Andy Warhol, but right now the art world is trying to anoint Mr. Richter.”

Read the WSJ article.  Mr. Richter’s career is a testament of patience.  He was ‘kind of a big deal’ in Germany, but as the article showcases, the real turning point in his career did not come until 1995.  I know; Anthony, my company can’t wait decades to make it big.  I understand.  Don’t take the notion literally; what I wanted to bring to light was the patience-leading-to-possible-domino-effect phenomenon.

 

 

Let’s revisit Dr. Pete’s advice.  He says do something then talk (or as I would like to think about it – then be worthy of conversation).  Do you want it now!?  Well, take it from a bona fide brat; such impatient yearnings are going to get your brand into trouble, take influence on your reputation, and have many (consumer and cohorts included) weighing and measuring your company.  Guess what happens to bratty, rotten eggs?