I don’t know who or what meets you or your marketing team’s definition of ‘king’; but, ensuring your viewers are content is pretty important methinks.  I bet those who consume your brand’s content would agree with me.

Can I answer all your brand’s viewer content questions in this post?  Absolutely not.  I can offer some ideas though.  Many times, I’ll suggest brands think exactly like their consumers.  I consume a lot of content on the Web on a daily basis.  I may or may not be included in your brand’s targeted market; but, definitely consider the following because it comes from a ‘consumer’s’ perspective.

 

What Kind of Content?
I’ve mentioned many times that content does not have to be written.  Some people like to read, some people like to browse, some people like to watch, others want to listen.  What do your content consumers want?

Perhaps take a gander at some major brands in your vertical.  Perhaps that brand is a head of the curve.  What varieties of content do they produce?  Take a look at the reader perception of some posts.  Are some posts getting shared more?  Can you make sense of any patterns?

For instance, common sense tells me a visually DIY post is going to be more successful than a textual one.  Moreover, do you offer a product?  It is likely people will want to see how something works before they buy.  If two brands have similar products, yet one does a better job showcasing how its product meets consumer needs, which one do you think ‘wins’ more often?

 

Flexing Publishing
How many pieces of content are optimal to produce per week?  There’s a definite answer; you should know it.  Are you ready for the magic number?  There isn’t one.  Know your readers; track your site traffic; track your shares (subtracting the ‘in-house’ shares).

Producing content is not like lifting weights.  You won’t necessarily get ‘bigger’ as you produce more content.  When your brand gets traffic numbers like the Wall Street Journal and New York Times, then sure, churn out that level of content.  Until then, understand more does not make you bigger.

Some brands like being more methodical and plan, using an editorial calendar.  That’s great; but, I would use one in relation to ‘evergreen’ content, content that could always be beneficial, not being aligned to current events.  On the other hand, sometimes industry events unfold and consumers may want to know about current events.  Your brand may have to step outside of its calendar and give the consumers what they want.

 

New Kid on the Blog
I’m a new person in a small town.  If I do nothing to engage others, should I expect people to rush up to me to get to know me?  Sure, some people will be curious about a new face, but that’s few and far between.  Otherwise, if I don’t do something on my end to integrate myself, I’m going to be pretty lonely in this new place.  You have to give to get.

What are your blog’s authors, your brand’s ‘facepeople’ doing to engage the community?  It would be great if web browsers were starving for information and all you had to do was erect a blog, satiating the masses.  It would be great; but, the reality is quite the opposite.  Each passing day, it’s likely there’s yet another brand, pretty much just like yours, trying to vie for the same market.  Some of them may actually be trying to actively draw people into reading, conversations, collaborations, answering questions, etc.

How well is your brand known?  How well is your brand really trying to be known?  Your content’s lack of greatness may have nothing to do with the content itself and everything to do with your level of engagement in your space.  If you want people to come to your blog, you must first reach out; establish connections, reminding viewers your content is there to serve them.