Moz, creator of popular SEO tools like Open Site Explorer (tracks links pointing to websites) and MozBar (ranks websites’ authority), does more than create amazing tools that make the lives of website owners and online marketers easy. Moz also hosts an amazing resource that helps you understand every important Google update and algorithm change made since the year 2000.

If you already know Moz, you may already be familiar with the resource I’m about to spill. But if you don’t know Moz, or just use it for its awesome (partially-free) SEO tools, you’re going to love me for sharing this with you:

Moz Logo

Moz’s Google Algorithm Change History

With the Change History tool, Moz provides a history of Google updates and algorithm changes from 2000 to present, offering brief descriptions and one or two links to highly informative articles on the subject. These articles are by trusted sources like the Google Press Blog, Search Engine Land and Moz contributors themselves.

Read through this entire list and I guarantee you you’ll become more Google savvy than 90% of people who own and operate websites. Do a little each night or breeze through it all in one sitting. Trust me, the investment of time is worth it if you’re serious about getting found on Google and understanding the search engine landscape better.

And rest assured, this isn’t a boring list. Google, as a company that’s passionate about delivering the best search results, has quite a number of updates that will amuse you and, at the same time, make you feel good about relying on it so heavily.

One update I came across that made me especially proud to be a Google freak was the “Payday Loan” Update. This update targeted the Internet’s “spammiest” queries – those related to payday loans and pornography. According to an article by Search Engine Land, “this update impacted roughly 0.3% of the U.S. queries, but went as high as 4% for Turkish queries where Web spam is typically higher.”

And with an average of 5-plus billion searches per day, that 0.3% accounts for about 150 million daily searches.

Right now, you may be asking “Rob, why didn’t you just share this Change History via Twitter, Facebook and Google+? The link to the Moz page would have sufficed.”

Well, for one, I love talking to you; and two, I also wanted to share this handy Google Search Timeline with you.

Google Search Timeline Image

In my opinion, if you’re interested in learning the most you can about Google in as little time as possible, this chart and the Moz Change History are the only things you need to study.

Learn more about Google and, in turn, rule the web more effectively. Remember, Google is how you get found. So it’s worth investigating how you get found (repeated phrase intended).