Business people, I see you out there, checking your personal emails, looking at your sister-in-law’s vacation pictures on Facebook, and trying to figure out Instagram for your Android.  Basically, you have some time, spare time.  No, I don’t want to hear the excuses, as if I was your personal trainer. But I am going to tell you to work!

How serious are you about online exposure?  Is online marketing a fad you heard of, one you would like to ‘try,’ one you would like to wear around your key ring like a scarcely used gym membership?  SEO is not a fad.  Social media optimization is not a trend.  Cultivating online reputation and authority does not ‘sound interesting’; it’s an absolute need.  Are you ready to get to work?  If not, there’s the door (points away from computer).  I don’t think you’re strong enough to survive in here.  If so, here are two exercises to consider:

Community Squats
I know you’ve probably heard an SEO practitioner or two say something about engagement.  Does your vertical have an online presence?  It’s likely.  How would you rate your participation?  Could you put in more effort?  Think about a healthy dose of regular participation.  Do you read and comment on other blogs?  Doing so is the trademark of a community contributor.  The process (like being healthy) has intrinsic value; it’s good for you, expanding your knowledge; but, some people need extrinsic rewards and motivation.  I read Bill Slawski’s review of the Google comment patent.  It’s thorough and deserves a read; but, in short, participation and ‘who’ one is online may become more important, influencing search results.

You want your community to feel your presence.

“Under an Agent Rank/Author Rank approach, the reputation scores for authors could influence search rankings in social search and Web search. It’s also possible that the reputations of commentors could influence those rankings as well.”

What is further interesting is the notion that the authority of other authors (commenting on ‘your’ blog) may influence the rankings of that Web page:

“In addition, the reputations of particular authors may be used to adjust the reputations of other authors. For example, if Stephen King (who presumably knows his stuff, as the author of On Writing) gives 5 stars or a similar high ranking to another author, the reputation of that other author will increase more than it would if an unknown with a small reputation did the same.”

Content Curls
I also read another great post earlier by Gianluca Fiorelli on content curation.  I love reading and gathering content.  You should too.  It’s good for you.  I suggest going through the post because it links to a lot of tools, necessary for identifying, gathering, and producing content.

There are a lot of benefits to exercising with content.  For one, you’re learning in the process.  You’re learning of authoritative personalities, hot topics, evergreen topics, and best practices in your respective vertical.  Additionally, you’re indirectly creating a good reputation for yourself in the process, a keeper of great content.

As Gianluca analogizes, think of the Web as an enormously vast warehouse; consumers enter the warehouse with particular needs in mind.  Wouldn’t you like to be known as someone who curates content in your vertical, possibly branding yourself as a ‘source,’ where people go to first rather than look for the resources you already discovered and maintain?  I would.

 

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