Blogging is a form of communication.  Offline, when a communicative process is not getting optimal results, a modification is in order.  For instance, if the reception of a cellular phone is bad, you’ll move to get better service.  Blogging should experience the same trial-and-error processes.  Can you hear me now?  I’ve noticed a few wrongdoings with the blogosphere, committed by those writing, promoting, and commenting.  Consider the following wrongs and making modifications for the future.

Blogging

-          Be quick on the draw.  Are you writing about the same topics as others in your vertical?  If you’re not amongst the most-popular blogs in your space, you’re wasting time.  Don’t chase the same stories as a number of personalities in your space unless you can put your own spin, perspective, or add more to it.  Otherwise, you’re offering the same products already on the shelf; readers are likely to grab the name-brand posts first.

-          Do you enjoy writing?  If you don’t, it’s likely to come out between the lines. Don’t fret; consider using a helper or ghost writer.  The writer can merely be the scriber, the person who comprises your thoughts on paper.  There’s no reason to disconnect your name from your thoughts.

-          Be consistent with your writing, especially if you’re building an audience.  It may be best practice to post on pre-elected days; that way, the readership has a level of expectation you can appropriately address.  Being sporadic and lazy may turn readers away or make them think your ability to post is ‘unstable.’

Promoting

-          Are you writing a post, hitting publish, and waiting?  That’s a bad idea, even for a well-read personality.  There is way too much information these days.  People are ‘busy’ online; you can’t expect them to know you published unless they have subscribed to your blog.  It’s absolutely necessary to promote posts via social media.

-          Do you promote the posts of others?  There is a golden rule in blogging.  Sharing others’ posts shows those in your community you’re active and participating.  It also raises the chances of others sharing your content.  Blogging is a community effort; you’re not just writing for your eyes alone; blogging is a social activity; so, make sure you’re interacting.

-          Are you promoting the same article on several platforms?  If you have a lot of the same followers and friends, you’re confronting them with reruns.  It’s likely not very appreciated.  Segment your content and make a clear distinction between types of content displayed on separate platforms.

Commenting

-          Do you want readers, shares, and comments?  You must engage in the same kinds of activities.  Comment on other bloggers’ posts.  This can be done within your respective vertical and beyond.  Could readers in another space benefit from your blog’s insight?  Make an impression outside of your vertical, inspiring readers to take interest in you and your blog.

-          Are you leaving comments just to write something, anything?  Do you leave URLs pointing back to your own posts or online properties?  In many cases, these are not championed and often highlight ulterior motives, such as commenting for selfish means.  Make a comment to strengthen your own authority as well as enhance the education of the community.  The blogosphere is much larger than you and your business!

-          Are you attempting to make a connection with the writer in the comments?  Think about your own writing.  Would you like to feel as if your post was read, reviewed, and pondered?  Of course you would-all writers would enjoy that.  Consider revisiting a point within the post or directly writing to the writer in your comments.  Commenting is not just about writing something; it’s about forming relations!

 

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